Which is right for you? OM, Dreadnought or Mini-Dread Style?

Voyage-Air acoustic guitars are made in two different body styles: The “OM” stands for “Orchestra Model”, and “Dreadnought” denotes a large-bodied guitar of a particular shape. These are names used to describe guitar body shapes and dimensions, and have been used by guitar makers for nearly 100 years.

So which one is right for you? The size difference is small, but the two guitars feel and play very differently from one another.

OM-style guitars have a slightly smaller body size, and are more comfortable to play when sitting. The smaller size makes for a smaller area of wood for the sound board (resonant top of the guitar), so it’s easier for the strings to vibrate the top of the guitar at low volumes. This means that OM-style guitars provide more ‘detail’ and ‘articulation’ to the sound when individual notes are played. OM-style guitars also have a slightly wider neck (1 ¾ inch wide at the nut), which makes it easier to pluck individual notes and provides a bit more room for fast runs of notes. In general, you can say that OM-style guitars are more suited for fingerstyle or ‘solo guitar’ playing, where the emphasis is on individual notes, rather than strumming chords.

Dreadnought guitars have a large body size, and are made to be louder: to project sound. The larger surface area for the resonant sound board means that Dreadnought guitars can achieve more volume. Without amplification, these guitars can still be heard in a group of other instruments. Dreadnought guitars typically have a slightly narrower neck that makes it easy to play complex chords. Especially ‘bar chords’ where your first-finger has to clamp down all the strings. In general, you can say that Dreadnought guitars are made to be strummed and for playing chords.

The Mini Dreadnought is a new addition to the Voyage-Air product line. Slightly smaller than a Dreadnought (15/16 size), the difference is profound: This model fits comfortably on your lap, making it an easy player for women and young students. It has the full neck width of a Dreadnought, but a slightly shorter scale for the frets (24.5" vs 25.5"). Younger and smaller hands will appreciate this difference when playing complex chords that require "reach." This all-new Mini Dreadnought retains the classic sound of its full-size brothers - yet is crafted in a rugged and uniquely affordable design. This guitar is a bargain!

A Folding Guitar

A Folding Guitar

How It Works - Innovation and engineering has made the folding guitar possible. Here, we give you an overview on unpacking and assembling the Voyage-Air Guitar acoustic and electric models.

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Patented Hinge

Patented Hinge

The Patented Voyage-Air Folding Neck-Hinge System is the key to how our instruments fold in half and fit into a backpack-style case for easy stowage and traveling!

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What is a Captive Nut?

What is a Captive Nut?

The Captive Nut, made of durable Corian, the strings are guided through precision-centered holes in the nut. This precisely locates...

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What is a Zero Fret?

What is a Zero Fret?

A zero fret is simply another fret positioned where a standard nut would be situated. It allows much better control of ...

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Shop Acoustics

Shop Acoustics

Voyage-Air Guitar acoustics are now available with an optional pickup system.  Are you a left-handed guitarist?  We now offer all Transit and Songwriter series with a left-handed option.

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Shop Electrics

Shop Electrics

Voyage-Air TransAxe Series guitars include the Dura-Trans carry case that is slim, lightweight, and features a zippered pocket for accessories. 

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Owner Stories

Owner Stories

 A Voyage-Air Guitar enables anyone to take their music anywhere you go. This section features photos, stories, and videos from real owners.

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Read Reviews

Read Reviews

See what people are saying about the Travel Guitar that folds in half! Actual Voyage-Air Guitar owner testimonials from those who know the value and quality of the guitar. 

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